Happy “6th” with WordPress!

It, still, won’t escape my memory when I first wrote the very first two entries I had here on WordPress. Back then, I was a sophomore college junkie – little things. The little things which, eventually, transform into life-sized grizzly bears boggle my still-adulting-seventeen-year-old-mind:

I wrote about beauty reminders.

There was an encounter with a brute.

The succeeding entries came like the Wizard of Oz. I was writing, subsequently, everything which comes into my mind: wishes and dreams, frustrations, travels, and love.

Then, came the year 2017. I changed the Blog Title from SAMTHING EXTRAORDINARY to IT’S A “SAM”-THING and even changed the cover with “SAMMY” tile. Given the fact that this blog was known from its URL, I decided to give it a new wisp of personality. Every detail was personalized with the end in view of giving my readers or viewers the idea that they’re visiting a whole new world where only they and “SAMMY” exist. 🙂

The truth is, so long as days or years pass, I will, still, write. WordPress has been a part of me. Taking it away is taking a portion of me which makes me incomplete.

To my avid readers, please bear with me. Cheers to more years with you!

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💌,
SAM

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SammyTV📺: Pronunciation of Pangasinan towns/cities/barangays with Jez 🗣

 

​Sorry for the cloudy video. We were inside the van and we couldn’t switch on the light. Of course not, we said, “NO TO CAMERA FLASH” because it’s too ouchy to the eyes.

Certainly, we made this short period of time memorable before we, finally, bid our goodbyes to one another. 💔😭

Anyway, there are no goodbyes. We’ll see each other and travel together, soon, Jez! That’s for sure. ☺️🤗😘

Thanks for watching!

💌,

SAM

‘Jez’ Got Real 👩‍❤️‍👩

Back in the year 2014, right after my college graduation, I was called to be one of Pangasinan’s delegates for the 10th National Youth Parliament under the supervision of the National Youth Commission. Four representatives from Pangasinan were selected (three from University of Luzon, and one from University of Pangasinan-PHINMA).

“The Parliament of Youth Leaders, also known as the National Youth Parliament, is a gathering of at least 200 youth leaders and youth sector representatives from all over the country who engage in a simulated legislative process where they present, discuss, and craft policy recommendations that will address pressing issues that directly affect them.

Consistent with Republic Act 8044, otherwise known as the Youth in Nation-Building Act, the Youth Parliament meets at the call of the National Youth Commission every two years.” – National Youth Commission

Our main agenda, then, was the reformation of the Sangguniang Kabataan, which, honestly, on my video resume, I didn’t adhere to it at first. If I remember it right, I mentioned this in my previous blog post entitled, “Welcome to the Days of Future Past.”
This was the set up: Youths were divided into committees: Committee on Health (where I belong), Committtee on Employment, Committee on Education, and Committee on Participation.

When Kim, Ate Dawn, and I arrived at the Manila Grand Opera Hotel, we stayed in the hotel room before we head on to the Ambassadors’ Hall for the Preliminaries. By the way, this hotel played huge roles in Philippines’ history [the location of the inauguration of the members of the First Philippine Assembly in 1907], and I believe, since May is Heritage Month, the National Youth Commission decided to convene the youth there. And this is where Jez and I met, in the most unexpected and awkward situation.

Okay. Let’s go back to when we had just arrived. Later that night, after the Preliminaries, somebody’s knocking on our door. I opened it and to my surprise, a man and a lady with backpacks, said “Hi”. Then, the lady asked if there’s a space for her. Before answering, I looked at Ate Dawn and Kim who were, also, astonished by the fact that we’d not be, exclusively, using the room as we need to share it with a fellow. Later on, I opened the door for her. She asked the crew to provide her with an extra bed. And so the story starts there, but it doesn’t end…little did I know, when I opened the door, I was coined by her and her boyfriend as “ang babaeng galit sa mundo” because of my facial expression, then. 😂✌🏻

This lady was named as Jezrel Olaer, a delegate from Davao City, part of the Committee on Employment, and now a licensed Customs Broker. We had built an amazing friendship in the most extraordinary ways. Thanks to technology. This friendship was made possible despite our geographical distance. For three years, we shared each other’s lives and with and through God’s grace, we, finally, saw each other, again.
Truth be told, I had a planned trip in Davao but it didn’t push through because of an unforeseeable event. But God’s timing and ways are perfect! If I wasn’t able to go to Davao, Jez was scheduled for a Pangasinan trip. So, here we are. Tea sesh with her after she met my parents. *Butterflies all around my stomach* I had to admit I almost cried when I hugged her. It’s been three long years!

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This woman is, extremely, humble, sweet, and generous! Whenever I asked her questions answerable by “YES” or “NO”, she would answer me, “Opo” even if we are of the same age. Also, she had spoiled me with an abundant amount Davao delights (Durian candy, Durian Yema, Durian Pastillas, Durian Piaya because the real fruit is prohibited in airports, Mangosteen Candy, and Ube Candy). Aren’t they all sweet? She, also, included Taiwanese teas and key chain. As a support to my studying Law, she gave me a cute notebook, pens, and coloring book from Miniso. “I have to do some de-stressing,” she said. Oh, how sweet and supportive you are to my Law schooling, Jez! Thank you.

I have proven how disciplined people from Davao are. While she was ordering our teas, she, unconsciously, put her one thousand peso bill on top of the table just beside us. So I said, “Wow, Jez! Dyan mo lang talaga ilalagay?” Then, she said, “Sorry.” That’s not just it. Even after my instruction that Pangasinan is different from Davao, that in the former, you have to hold your wallet or even grocery bags all the time, she, used to put her wallet beside her where others could sit. When I noticed it, she laughed and said, “Sorry.” You see how normal it is for Davaoeños to leave their stuffs without fear of being robbed? It’s a lesson for me, for us, for every city in Philippines!

 

Thanks be to God because I found such a rare opportunity to meet good people. National Youth Commission, I commend you, too, for bringing youths to participate in policy-making as a tool to national development, and for making youths from across the archipelago friends for life! 🙂

Like I said, I’ll see you, soon, Jez. XOXOXO

💌,

SAM

5 DON’TS When Presenting in Class 📝

Don’t make them feel ignorant.

I am having a second row of blog post because oh, well. My thoughts and ideas just keep on flowing and we gotta make the most out of them!

Today, we had a real bloody [for me] lecture in Special Commercial Law and I got bored or uninterested in the middle because: First, I wasn’t able to read the topic [Securities Regulation Code], and second, I was expecting that somehow, the reporter would make us understand it in a way that a non-CPA would. Because, man, we finished different degrees and we exercise varying work. In short, not all of us are CPAs. I was kind of waiting or hoping that this ‘first view’, apart from being basic, would be comprehensive enough for the benefit of the whole class.

But to my disappointment, I hadn’t found an atmosphere of common ground because the report revolved around the law itself with only few practicable applications. Of course, since majority of the class are not CPAs, and especially when we had no or less time to read, most of us had a hard time. Hmmmn…or was it only me?

I, also, observed that we felt left behind on technical matters that only the experts among the class knew. The reporter and a CPA classmate had a discourse or questioning all throught the reporting which made me conclude: “They could be the only persons understanding each other here.”

So I had to get my phone and tweet my notions while the discourse went on…and on. Then, I planned to just read the topic.

Because of this incident and based on experience, let me give you a short list of DON’Ts when reporting in class or presenting to an audience:

1. Find something that the class relates to. 

2. Don’t make them feel ignorant.

  

3. Don’t focus on a single person, alone. It’s a report or presentation, NOT a display of skills. 


4. Aim to have your audience better understand your topic. 


5. Do not be afraid to entertain questions. 


Oh, I am way too eloquent tonight to express my views! As usual, I got the idea from my tweets. Thank you, Twitter! 🙈🙉

Remember: As a reporter, your main purpose is to facilitate, not to exacerbate. 🙂

💌,

SAM


Child, grow well. 

It’s Saturday – I just took off from my classes and consumed my secondary lunch meal. Sweetened Saba was my dessert, by the way. After washing the last of the dishes of which, I couldn’t remembering finishing them all, I found myself putting the incident in a miscroscope. I studied with a keen understanding every circumstance and dissected every detail. Then, I digested them.

These are my few realizations, which were tweeted, beforehand [I sort of got the idea by re-writing my tweets, editing, etc. to suit a blog post):

It is not right to inculcate in a child’s mind that when he did wrong, ‘Put the blame to others.’ Let him accept his own mistakes, instead. And make him learn. 

Be careful with the simple norm, or words, you impose upon or use to little children like, “We’ll spank her, Baby. Don’t you cry, again.” You are teaching them NOT to humble down and accept their own wrongs. These words may be too light to bear or too comforting for children, but they are not helping at all. Worse, you are growing an arrogant creature without you knowing. 

There is a thin line between generosity and vanity. Saying, “Don’t cry, we’ll buy that what you, really, wanted” comes close to being vain or envious. You’re teaching a child to desire more than what he had or to desire what belongs to others.

Be careful in showing too much affection or less attention to your children. This affects their way of dealing with life. They can be arrogant or lame. 

A child must be disciplined, outright, by no other than his own parents, if any, or guardian. This is the obligation of every person to their offsprings. Failure or negligence to do so would amount to inconsistent disciplinary action.

Admittedly, not because someone is a parent, he can impose any kind of discipline which he deems suitable. The universal and accepted Good Manners and Right Conduct is the yardstick for everyone. 

We, usually, don’t give second thoughts to what we say or do, but they have a deep impact on how one becomes or grows as a person. 

I know too well that I am, not yet, a parent. But these relay the same object, which is, DISCIPLINE – a must-know for, and must be possessed by every one, whether a parent or not. And these are the few things I had observed with my dealings with children. ‘Hope it helps in one way or another! 🙂

💌,
SAM

Bye, bye!

These days it’s hard to get a remote job. Most employers out there deny the existence of an employer-employee relationship due to failure to meet formal requirements, which they hadn’t even required. Don’t forget to ask for an employment contract. But whether or not there is a written contract, what is controlling is the meeting of the minds of the parties. Opt for a security of tenure. Avoid employment at will.

💌,
SAM